Tag Archives: Schiffer Books

Chaplet of Divine Mercy

8 Apr

Divine Mercy Sunday will be celebrated in the United States on April 8, 2018.

 

Sister Faustina is shown with a painting recreating the vision of Christ.

On April 30, 2000, Pope John Paul II declared, “Throughout the world the Second Sunday of Easter will receive the name Divine Mercy Sunday, a perennial invitation to the Christian world to face, with confidence in divine benevolence, the difficulties and trials that mankind will experience in the years to come.”   The pope made that proclamation during the mass in which he canonized Saint Faustina. ( The Feast of Mercy, EWTN, http://www.ewtn.com).

Saint Faustina was given the name Helen Kowalska at birth and took the name Sister Maria Faustina when she entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy.  It is said that Christ came to her and asked her to spread word of his mercy.  This Polish nun was instructed to have a painting made showing Christ with blood and water flowing from His sides and the words, “Jesus, I trust in you.

Sister Maria Faustina Kowalska (1905-1938) was a member of the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy.  Many rosaries have been created as remembrances of Divine Mercy.  The rosary shown above has a center medal showing Christ and it comes in a box that honors Saint Faustina.

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Pope Francis declared a Jubilee Year of Mercy that stretched from 2015 to 2016.  The Ghirelli Company created a rosary to honor that special time.  The Ghirelli Year of Mercy Rosary has a cross that shows both Christ and Pope Francis.

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The center medal of the Ghirelli Year of Mercy Rosary shows the Prodigal Son to emphasize the beauty of mercy and forgiveness.

 

The Divine Mercy Rosary shown above has beads of red and white to symbolize the blood and water flowing from Christ.  The center medal has Saint Faustina on one side and Christ on the reverse.

Catholics are encouraged to say the prayers known as the Chaplet of Divine Mercy at any time of the year.  Divine Mercy is especially remembered, however, on the Sunday following Easter.

To learn more about rosaries, center medals, crosses, and crucifixes, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  This hardcover reference book published by Schiffer Publishing contains over 200 color photographs ranging from the carved boxwood rosary owned by England’s King Henry VIII to rosaries honoring Pope Francis.  The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon, The Catholic Faith Store, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online sellers.

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Irish Horn Rosaries

17 Mar

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When we think of Irish rosaries, our thoughts often turn to those made of Connemara marble or those with Celtic crucifixes. The Irish Horn Rosary, however, is perhaps the most symbolic of Ireland because it represents the hard work of the people of Dublin.

In 1927, the Mitchell Rosary Factory opened in Dublin and began production of rosaries made of horn, a material derived from naturally shed antlers of deer and goats. While many celebrated the creation of new jobs, there was also a cost to the city. The horn was boiled in large vats to soften it for bead making. The smell of boiling horn was extremely strong and annoyed many residents. Young girls working in the factory covered their hair with nets in the hopes of keeping the smell from clinging. There were many objections to the smell and the Mitchell Rosary Factory stopped making horn rosaries circa 1960.

In his memoir, It’s a Long Way from Penny Apples, Bill Cullen discussed his family’s work with the Mitchell Rosary Factory. In addition to the many full-time factory workers, others who lived in Dublin picked up supplies and then strung beads at home. They were paid by the decade.

Irish horn rosaries usually have a heart-shaped center and a horn crucifix with a white corpus.

To learn more about antique and unusual rosaries, read our new book, The Rosary Collector’s Guide, available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon.com, the Catholic Faith Store, and other booksellers.

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Snowy Day Rosary

6 Jan

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A winter snowstorm has hit many parts of the United States.  Have you ever experienced a summer snowstorm?

According to legend, a summer snowstorm occurred in Italy in 352 A.D.    On the night of August 4,  a wealthy couple prayed to Mary, Our Lady, because they wanted a child to make them a family.   That night, Mary appeared to them in a dream and instructed them to build a church in her honor on the Esquiline Hill.  Mary said that the site for the new church would soon be outlined in snow.   On the same night, Mary also appeared to Pope Liberius and announced the coming of a miraculous summer snowfall.  When residents awoke on August 5, they found the Esquiline Hill covered in snow.  The outline of a church could be seen in the snow.  Less than two years later, the Basilica of Saint Mary Major was built on that site.   In honor of that summer snowfall,  Mary is sometimes referred to as Our Lady of the Snows.

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The rosary shown here has clear blue beads and a center medal honoring Our Lady of the Snows.    In place of Pater Beads, it has medals honoring additional titles for Mary including Our Lady of Fatima, Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal, Our Lady of Lourdes. and Our Lady of Perpetual Help.   Rosary makers have created many rosaries to commemorate the miraculous summer snowfall.  Some have bubble beads with images of Mary while others have unique pater beads.

 

helenpiochurchstTo learn more about antique and unique rosaries, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  Published by Schiffer Publishing,  The Rosary Collector’s Guide has over 200 color photographs of rosaries including those owned by England’s King Henry VIII, military rosaries of World Wars I and II, and rosaries honoring the events of September 11.   The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available in the Catholic Faith Store, Barnes and Noble, Amazon, and other religious article stores, book stores, and online sites.

Christmas Rosaries

23 Dec

advent1 Our grandparents usually owned a single rosary which they cherished throughout their lives.  In recent years, rosaries have been created to celebrate special occasions and holidays such as Christmas.

 

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The Christmas Rosary shown above has Ave beads (Hail Mary beads) of red and Pater beads (Our Father beads) of green.

 

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The crucifix of the Christmas Rosary has a poinsettia background.

 

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The center medal shows the Madonna and Child.

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The Ghirelli Company, founded in 1987, has designed rosaries for the Vatican.  Their Christmas Rosary, made in 2002, has a unique Star of David Crucifix.

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The Center Medal of the Ghirelli Christmas Rosary shows a manger scene.

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A Christmas Rosary can become a family heirloom of the season.

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To learn more about unique rosaries, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  This 152 page hardcover book has 240 color photographs of rosaries, crosses, crucifixes, and center medals.  Published by Schiffer Publishing, the Rosary Collector’s Guide is available on Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, The Catholic Faith Store Online, and other religious article stores and book stores.

 

Fr. Patrick Peyton: The Rosary Priest

20 Dec

 On December 19, 2017, Pope Francis issued a decree confirming that the late Father Patrick Peyton lived a life of heroic Christian virtue.  The decree moves this American priest one step closer to being declared a saint.

Father Peyton has been called the Rosary Priest because he encouraged families to pray the rosary together.  His motto was, “The family that prays together, stays together”.   In 1942, he wrote to every bishop in the United States to ask them to promote the family rosary.  He also recruited Hollywood stars such as Bing Crosby and Lucille Ball to motivate everyone to pray.

Father Patrick Peyton died in 1992.  His life was spent in service to the Catholic Church with special dedication to the rosary.

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To learn more about the rosary, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide, by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  This 152 page hardcover book published by Schiffer Publishing has over 200 color photographs and information on rosaries ranging from the Boxwood rosary owned by England’s King Henry VIII to rosaries honoring Pope Francis.  The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available in Barnes and Noble, Amazon, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online venues.

 

 

 

 

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Rosary of Our Lady of Guadalupe/ Roses in the Winter

12 Dec

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Many rosaries commemorate the vision known as Our Lady of Guadalupe. According to legend, on a winter day in 1531, Juan Diego, a member of the Aztec tribe who had recently converted to Catholicism, was walking in the hills of the Tepeyac Desert near Mexico City. He had a vision of a lady who asked him to tell the local bishop to build a church on that site. Juan made the request to Bishop Juan deZumarrage but the bishop wanted proof of the vision.

Juan went back to the scene of the vision and once again saw the lady. When Juan asked the lady to give some proof of her appearance, she told him to climb to the top of the hill and pick some flowers for the bishop. Although it was winter, Juan found Castillian roses growing on the desert hill. Castillian roses never grew in that area. Juan scooped the flowers into his cloak and went to find the bishop. When he arrived at the bishop’s home, the flowers fell from his cloak and formed the image of the lady. That cloak is now displayed in the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe.  Juan Diego Cuahtlatoatzin was made a saint in 2002.  The Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe is celebrated every year on December 12.
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The rosary shown has a Stanhope Cross. The term Stanhope is given to crosses and crucifixes which have a peephole. The peephole has a small lens with a magnifying glass through which images of holy places or saints can be seen. This cross has an image of Our Lady of Guadalupe hidden inside.
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The pendant of this rosary ( the first Our Father bead, three Hail Mary beads, and second Our Father bead) spell the name Maria (Mary).

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The center medal has an image of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

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The reverse of the center medal shows the roses found by Juan Diego.
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The Our Father beads have images of the vision of Our Lady of Guadalupe.
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Many materials have been used to create rosaries honoring Our Lady of Guadalupe. The rosary shown above was made in Italy and has beads of Murano Glass.
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The center medal of the Murano Glass rosary has an image of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

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The reverse of the center medal shows Juan Diego with Our Lady.

http://www.amazon.com/Rosary-Collectors-Guide-Gloria-Hoffner/dp/0764345354

To learn more about unusual rosaries, crosses, crucifixes, and center medals, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner, This 152 page hardcover reference book has 240 color photographs and helps historians, antique dealers, and rosary collectors identify unique religious articles. The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available on Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble.com, the Catholic Faith Store Online, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online suppliers.
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Helen Hoffner and Gloria Brady Hoffner, authors of The Rosary Collector’s Guide, are often able to bring their rosary collection to show to church groups, school groups, and community organizations. If you would like to arrange a presentation in New Jersey, Delaware, New York, or Pennsylvania or if you have a question about rosaries, contact the authors at rosarycollector@aol.com

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Anniversary & Feast of the Miraculous Medal Celebrated on November 27

26 Nov

Mary appeared to St. Catherine Laboure' and gave her a vision of the Miraculous Medal.

The Miraculous Medal is perhaps the most popular of all religious medals. It is said that in 1830, Mary appeared to Catherine Laboure’, a novice of the community of the Daughters of Charity, in Paris. Mary showed young Catherine a design and asked her to have a medal struck with the image shown.

The front of the Miraculous Medal shows Mary and says, "O Mary conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee".

The reverse of the medal shows 12 stars encircling a large letter M   under a cross.   Two hearts are beneath the M, one encircled by thorns and one pierced by a sword. The reverse of the medal shows 12 stars encircling a large letter M under a cross. ( The twelve stars represent the twelve apostles.) Two hearts are beneath the M, one encircled by thorns and one pierced by a sword.[/caption]

Sometimes individuals purchasing a rosary at an estate sale or auction see the date of 1830 imprinted at the bottom of the center medal and believe that they are buying an antique. That is often not the case, however, because all Miraculous Medals, regardless of when they were made, bear the date of 1830, the year of the vision. The vision occurred in 1830 but the first Miraculous Medals were not made until 1832 and they were not placed on rosaries until after 1880.

The pater medals ( Our Father medals) on this blue St. Catherine Laboure' rosary have images related to the vision of Mary.

The St. Catherine Laboure’ rosary has blue beads to honor Mary and medals between each decade that show significant events related to the vision this saint experienced. The rosary’s center medal represents the Chapel of the Apparition in Paris, the place where the vision occurred.

St. Catherine Laboure' is shown on the pater bead of this rosary.

Pater medals and the center medal of this rosary honor the vision St. Catherine Laboure' experienced.

The Feast of the Miraculous Medal is celebrated on November 27.

RosaryCollectorsGuide

To learn more about antique and unusual rosaries, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide, a 152 page hardcover reference book by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner. The book is available in Barnes and Noble, Catholic Faith Store Online, and Amazon.com. If you have questions about rosaries, contact the authors at rosarycollector@aol.com

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