Tag Archives: Ghirelli

Rosaries of the United States : A July 4 Celebration

2 Jul

Independence Day, July 4, is a time when Americans can show their love for their country with their rosaries.

 

 

Metal rosaries were given to soldiers during World Wars I and II.  They were often called pullchain rosaries because they resembled the pullchains used on plumbing and lighting fixtures.  Some soldiers blued (darkened) their rosaries so that they would not shine and reveal their location to enemies.

At times, soldiers received beltbags that contained rosaries and prayerbooks.

 

   Soldiers have carried rosary rings onto the battlefield because they could easily be slipped into a pocket.

 

     

St. Kateri Tekakwitha was the first Native American to be named a saint.  Rosaries honoring St. Kateri are made in many colors to show her love for the environment.

Rosaries have been created in remembrance of one of the most tragic days in American history, September 11, 2001.  The 9-11 rosary, created by the Ghirelli Company, has beads that honor all of the 50 states.

        

 

The center medal of the 9-11 rosary shows Christ at the Twin Towers.

          

The crucifix of the 9-11 rosary replicates steel found at the site of the World Trade Center.

 

 

When Pope Francis visited the United States in 2015, he joined in the red, white, and blue spirit with commemorative rosaries.

Pope Francis knew that Americans could celebrate their country with their rosaries.

 

To learn more about rosaries, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.

The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Barnes and Noble, the Catholic Faith Store, Amazon, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online vendors.  This 152 page, hardcover reference book published by Schiffer Publishing has over 200 color photographs of rosaries ranging from the Boxwood rosary of England’s King Henry VIII to those honoring Pope Francis.

 

 

 

 

Rosaries of Mother Teresa of Calcutta and Jacinta of Fatima

5 Jun

   On September 4, 2016, Pope Francis elevated Mother Teresa of Calcutta to sainthood.  A few months later on May 13, 2017, the Pope canonized Jacinta, one of the children who saw the Blessed Mother Mary at Fatima.  What do Jacinta and Mother Teresa have in common?   They were born in the same year and could have worked together to spread Mary’s message.  Mother Teresa was born on August 26, 1910 in Skopje, Macedonia.  Jacinta was born in Portugal on March 11, 1910.

Mother Teresa passed away at the age of 87 while Jacinta lived only to the age of 11.   Consequently, the world remembers Mother Teresa as an elderly nun who served the poorest of the poor while  Jacinta is thought of as a child.

Both Mother Teresa and Jacinta were devoted to the rosary.

Jacinta encouraged everyone to pray the rosary. Today, many rosaries have been made to honor Jacinta and the vision of Mary that she saw at Fatima.

The rosary shown above has an image of Jacinta on one of the Pater beads (Our Father beads).  The center has an image of Mary that is based on a description given by another child of Fatima, Jacinta’s older cousin Lucia.

The rosary shown above was made by the Ghirelli Company in remembrance of the canonization of Mother Teresa.  It has blue and white beads to honor the colors of the  Missionaries of Charity, the order that Mother Teresa founded.  Mother Teresa is shown on the center medal.

The reverse of the center medal and crucifix carry some of Mother Tersea’s favorite sayings, ” It is not how much we do, but how much love we put into what we do” and ” A little pencil in the hand of God”.

While many rosaries of beautiful beads have been made to honor Mother Teresa, she carried a very simple rosary made of Job’s Tears.

The Job’s Tears Rosary is composed of natural materials, the tear dropped shaped fruit of the plant known by botanists as Coix lacryma-jobi.   Because this fruit has a hole at the tip, craftsmen often use it to string necklaces and bracelets.   Mother Teresa and the sisters of her order chose to make rosaries with  Job’s Tears.

  

The work of Jacinta of Fatima and Teresa of Calcutta have inspired many rosaries.

To learn more about unique rosaries, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  This 152 page hardcover reference book has over 200 color photographs of rosaries, crosses, crucifixes, and center medals ranging from the Boxwood rosary of England’s King Henry VIII to those honoring Pope Francis.  The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon.com, Walmart.com, the Catholic Faith Store, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online vendors.

Fatima Rosaries & Pilgrimages: The Sacrifices of Lucia

4 Jun

 

In 2017, the Catholic Church is celebrating the 100th anniversary of Mary’s appearance to three children in Fatima, Portugal.  This anniversary will bring additional tourists to the site of the apparitions.  While large crowds are now considered good news for the local economy, that was not always the case.

Lucia, the only one of the three children of Fatima who lived to adulthood, wrote of the hardships that visitors brought to her family.

The specific site of Mary’s appearance was a parcel of land owned by Lucia’s parents.  They called it the Cova da Iria.  This was very fertile ground on which the family grew corn, beans, and other vegetables.  Sheep grazed here.  In her 1946 writing, however, Lucia stated, “As soon as people began to gather there we could no longer use the land for anything, for the people trampled everything and what little was left was eaten by the pack-animals on which some of the people rode there” *     The family lost their vegetable gardens and they had to sell their flock of sheep because so many pilgrims came to the site.

Day and night visitors knocked on her door begging Lucia to pray for their special causes.  Others accused Lucia of making up stories about Mary just to make money.  The many guests made it nearly impossible for the family to earn a living.     Lucia regretted that the visions had cause tremendous turmoil and financial strain for her family.

Today, Lucia and the other two children of Fatima, Jacinta and Francisco, are honored as special messengers chosen by heaven.   It must be remembered, however, that they endured  many trials in bringing Mary’s message to the world.

Reference: Galamba de Oliveira, J. (1946). Jacinta: The Flower of Fatima. New York: The Catholic Book Publishing Company, pp. 154-155.

 

          Many rosaries now honor the children of Fatima.  The rosary shown above has images of the children on the cross.  This Fatima 100th anniversary rosary is made by the Ghirelli Company.

 

To learn more about rosaries, crosses, crucifixes, and center medals, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  This 152 page hardcover reference book has over 200 color photographs of rosaries ranging from those owned by England’s King Henry VIII to those honoring Pope Francis.  Published by Schiffer Publishing, The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon, the Catholic Faith Store, Walmart.com, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online sellers.

 

 

100th Anniversary of the Apparitions of Fatima Rosary by Ghirelli

13 May

    May 13, 2017 marked the 100th Anniversary of the day on which Mary, the Blessed Mother, appeared to three children, Lucia, Francisco, and Jacinta, in Fatima, Portugal.   On that day, Mary told the children to return to the same place on the 13th of each month.  The children did as they were told and saw Mary every month from May 1917 to October 1917.

The Ghirelli Company, supplier of religious articles to the Vatican, made a rosary to commemorate the anniversary.

 The crucifix of this 100th anniversary rosary shows the Basilica and the Colonnade, the shrine that now marks the place of the Apparitions.  The three  children are shown walking toward the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

 The reverse of the crucifix has the anniversary dates, 1917-2017, and the words that Mary said to the children, ” My Immaculate Heart will be your refuge and the way that will lead to God”.

 The center medal has an image of Mary and a Crown of Thorns in the shape of the Immaculate Heart.

  The reverse of the center medal has the words, ” In the end, my Immaculate Heart will triumph”.

Our Lady of the Rosary

In 1947, Jose Thedim received a commission to create a statute to commemorate Mary’s appearance to Lucia, Francisco, and Jacinta. The sculptor based his art on a description he received directly from Lucia, who in 1947 was a nun living in a convent in central Portugal.  (Francisco and Jacinta died in childhood during a  flu epidemic.)   The statue is remarkable in that it is the only artistic representation of Mary that is based on a description from someone who actually saw her.

This representation of Mary wearing a white gown is often called Our Lady of the Rosary because that is the title Mary used when the children asked for her name.

 

To learn more about rosaries, crosses, crucifixes, and medals read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  This 152 hardcover reference book, published by Schiffer Publishing, has over 200 color photographs of rosaries ranging from the Boxwood Rosary of England’s King Henry VIII to those honoring Pope Francis.

The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available from Barnes and Noble, Amazon, the Catholic Faith Store, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online vendors.

 

 

Divine Mercy Rosaries

22 Apr

Sister Faustina is shown with a painting recreating the vision of Christ.

On April 30, 2000, Pope John Paul II declared, “Throughout the world the Second Sunday of Easter will receive the name Divine Mercy Sunday, a perennial invitation to the Christian world to face, with confidence in divine benevolence, the difficulties and trials that mankind will experience in the years to come.”   The pope made that proclamation during the mass in which he canonized Saint Faustina. ( The Feast of Mercy, EWTN, http://www.ewtn.com).

Saint Faustina was given the name Helen Kowalska at birth and took the name Sister Maria Faustina when she entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy.  It is said that Christ came to her and asked her to spread word of his mercy.  This Polish nun was instructed to have a painting made showing Christ with blood and water flowing from His sides and the words, “Jesus, I trust in you.

Sister Maria Faustina Kowalska (1905-1938) was a member of the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy.  Many rosaries have been created as remembrances of Divine Mercy.  The rosary shown above has a center medal showing Christ and it comes in a box that honors Saint Faustina.

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Pope Francis declared a Jubilee Year of Mercy that stretched from 2015 to 2016.  The Ghirelli Company created a rosary to honor that special time.  The Ghirelli Year of Mercy Rosary has a cross that shows both Christ and Pope Francis.

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The center medal of the Ghirelli Year of Mercy Rosary shows the Prodigal Son to emphasize the beauty of mercy and forgiveness.

 

The Divine Mercy Rosary shown above has beads of red and white to symbolize the blood and water flowing from Christ.  The center medal has Saint Faustina on one side and Christ on the reverse.

Catholics are encouraged to say the prayers known as the Chaplet of Divine Mercy at any time of the year.  Divine Mercy is especially remembered, however, on the Sunday following Easter.

To learn more about rosaries, center medals, crosses, and crucifixes, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  This hardcover reference book published by Schiffer Publishing contains over 200 color photographs ranging from the carved boxwood rosary owned by England’s King Henry VIII to rosaries honoring Pope Francis.  The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon, The Catholic Faith Store, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online sellers.

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Going Dancing with the Stars? Take Your Rosary !

1 Apr

 When Olympic gymnast Simone Biles traveled to Los Angeles to compete in Dancing with the Stars  did she bring along her gold medals?  Probably not, but it is highly likely that she brought her rosary.   During her years of competing in national and international events,  the talented gymnast always carried her rosary in her duffel bag.  She told US Weekly, “My mom, Nellie, got me a rosary at church. I don’t use it to pray before a competition. I’ll just pray normally to myself, but I have it there in case.” *

Gold medals are great souvenirs but a rosary is essential.  When you see Simone on the dance floor, know that her rosary is with her.

To learn more about rosaries, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  With over 200 color photographs of rosaries, crosses, crucifixes, and center medals, this 152 page hardcover book published by Schiffer Publishing will answer your questions about the rosary’s history.  From the boxwood rosary owned by England’s King Henry VIII to rosaries honoring Pope Francis, this book will show you unique rosaries throughout history.

The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble.com, the Catholic Faith Store, Rosary Parts, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online sites.

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Reference: Sprunk, Cara. World Champion Gymnast, Olympic Hopeful Simone Biles: What’s In My Bag?

http:/www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-style/news/simone-biles-whats-in-my-bag-w212070?utm_source=email

Travels with The Rosary Collector’s Guide

1 Jan

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Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner, authors of The Rosary Collector’s Guide, enjoy visiting book stores, schools, churches, and colleges to exhibit their collection of over 900 antique and unusual rosaries.   Guests at these events often bring rosaries and ask the authors to help them determine the age and origin of their treasures.

displaySome of the rosaries that raise the most questions are the unique Mexican lasso rosaries and the pullchain rosaries given to members of the military during World Wars I and II.

911rosary1 The 911 Remembrance Rosary made by Ghirelli evokes the most stirring responses.

booksigningmomnicoleIt is always interesting to hear stories of family rosaries and the journeys those rosaries have made. booksigningmom3booksigningcataniafamily

booksigningmomTo learn more about antique and unusual rosaries, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide, by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  The 152 page hardback book shows and describes rosaries ranging from the carved Boxwood rosary of England’s King Henry VIII to rosaries honoring Pope Francis.  With over 240 color photorgraphs, The Rosary Collector’s Guide helps everyone identify rosaries and learn more about their history.

The Rosary Collector’s Guide is published by Schiffer Publishing and  is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon.com, the Catholic Faith Store,  Adoremus, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online vendors.

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