Tag Archives: center medals

Rosaries of the United States : A July 4 Celebration

2 Jul

Independence Day, July 4, is a time when Americans can show their love for their country with their rosaries.

 

 

Metal rosaries were given to soldiers during World Wars I and II.  They were often called pullchain rosaries because they resembled the pullchains used on plumbing and lighting fixtures.  Some soldiers blued (darkened) their rosaries so that they would not shine and reveal their location to enemies.

At times, soldiers received beltbags that contained rosaries and prayerbooks.

 

   Soldiers have carried rosary rings onto the battlefield because they could easily be slipped into a pocket.

 

     

St. Kateri Tekakwitha was the first Native American to be named a saint.  Rosaries honoring St. Kateri are made in many colors to show her love for the environment.

Rosaries have been created in remembrance of one of the most tragic days in American history, September 11, 2001.  The 9-11 rosary, created by the Ghirelli Company, has beads that honor all of the 50 states.

        

 

The center medal of the 9-11 rosary shows Christ at the Twin Towers.

          

The crucifix of the 9-11 rosary replicates steel found at the site of the World Trade Center.

 

 

When Pope Francis visited the United States in 2015, he joined in the red, white, and blue spirit with commemorative rosaries.

Pope Francis knew that Americans could celebrate their country with their rosaries.

 

To learn more about rosaries, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.

The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Barnes and Noble, the Catholic Faith Store, Amazon, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online vendors.  This 152 page, hardcover reference book published by Schiffer Publishing has over 200 color photographs of rosaries ranging from the Boxwood rosary of England’s King Henry VIII to those honoring Pope Francis.

 

 

 

 

Fatima Rosaries: June 13 and The Immaculate Heart of Mary

12 Jun

 

From May to October 1917, Mary, the Blessed Mother, appeared on the 13th of each month to three children near Fatima, Portugal.

During the June 13, 1917 appearance, Mary referred to her Immaculate Heart.  In her memoirs, Lucia, the oldest of the children, recalled that Mary said, “Are you suffering a great deal?  Don’t lose heart.  I will never forsake you.  My Immaculate Heart will be your refuge and the way that will lead you to God”.  *

Many rosaries honoring the Blessed Mother’s appearances at Fatima contain symbols of Mary’s Immaculate Heart.  The pictures above show Mary’s words on  the center medal and cross of the Fatima 100th Anniversary Rosary made by the Ghirelli Company of Italy.

To learn more about rosaries, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  This 152 page, hardcover reference book published by Schiffer Publishing has over 200 color photographs of rosaries, crosses, center medals, and crucifixes ranging from the Boxwood Rosary owned by England’s King Henry VIII to rosaries honoring Pope Francis.  The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon.com, the Catholic Faith Store, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online vendors.

*M., Irmã,. (1976). Fatima in Lucia’s own words : Sister Lucia’s memoirs. Fatima, Portugal: Postulation Centre.

Rosaries of Mother Teresa of Calcutta and Jacinta of Fatima

5 Jun

   On September 4, 2016, Pope Francis elevated Mother Teresa of Calcutta to sainthood.  A few months later on May 13, 2017, the Pope canonized Jacinta, one of the children who saw the Blessed Mother Mary at Fatima.  What do Jacinta and Mother Teresa have in common?   They were born in the same year and could have worked together to spread Mary’s message.  Mother Teresa was born on August 26, 1910 in Skopje, Macedonia.  Jacinta was born in Portugal on March 11, 1910.

Mother Teresa passed away at the age of 87 while Jacinta lived only to the age of 11.   Consequently, the world remembers Mother Teresa as an elderly nun who served the poorest of the poor while  Jacinta is thought of as a child.

Both Mother Teresa and Jacinta were devoted to the rosary.

Jacinta encouraged everyone to pray the rosary. Today, many rosaries have been made to honor Jacinta and the vision of Mary that she saw at Fatima.

The rosary shown above has an image of Jacinta on one of the Pater beads (Our Father beads).  The center has an image of Mary that is based on a description given by another child of Fatima, Jacinta’s older cousin Lucia.

The rosary shown above was made by the Ghirelli Company in remembrance of the canonization of Mother Teresa.  It has blue and white beads to honor the colors of the  Missionaries of Charity, the order that Mother Teresa founded.  Mother Teresa is shown on the center medal.

The reverse of the center medal and crucifix carry some of Mother Tersea’s favorite sayings, ” It is not how much we do, but how much love we put into what we do” and ” A little pencil in the hand of God”.

While many rosaries of beautiful beads have been made to honor Mother Teresa, she carried a very simple rosary made of Job’s Tears.

The Job’s Tears Rosary is composed of natural materials, the tear dropped shaped fruit of the plant known by botanists as Coix lacryma-jobi.   Because this fruit has a hole at the tip, craftsmen often use it to string necklaces and bracelets.   Mother Teresa and the sisters of her order chose to make rosaries with  Job’s Tears.

  

The work of Jacinta of Fatima and Teresa of Calcutta have inspired many rosaries.

To learn more about unique rosaries, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  This 152 page hardcover reference book has over 200 color photographs of rosaries, crosses, crucifixes, and center medals ranging from the Boxwood rosary of England’s King Henry VIII to those honoring Pope Francis.  The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon.com, Walmart.com, the Catholic Faith Store, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online vendors.

Divine Mercy Rosaries

22 Apr

Sister Faustina is shown with a painting recreating the vision of Christ.

On April 30, 2000, Pope John Paul II declared, “Throughout the world the Second Sunday of Easter will receive the name Divine Mercy Sunday, a perennial invitation to the Christian world to face, with confidence in divine benevolence, the difficulties and trials that mankind will experience in the years to come.”   The pope made that proclamation during the mass in which he canonized Saint Faustina. ( The Feast of Mercy, EWTN, http://www.ewtn.com).

Saint Faustina was given the name Helen Kowalska at birth and took the name Sister Maria Faustina when she entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy.  It is said that Christ came to her and asked her to spread word of his mercy.  This Polish nun was instructed to have a painting made showing Christ with blood and water flowing from His sides and the words, “Jesus, I trust in you.

Sister Maria Faustina Kowalska (1905-1938) was a member of the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy.  Many rosaries have been created as remembrances of Divine Mercy.  The rosary shown above has a center medal showing Christ and it comes in a box that honors Saint Faustina.

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Pope Francis declared a Jubilee Year of Mercy that stretched from 2015 to 2016.  The Ghirelli Company created a rosary to honor that special time.  The Ghirelli Year of Mercy Rosary has a cross that shows both Christ and Pope Francis.

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The center medal of the Ghirelli Year of Mercy Rosary shows the Prodigal Son to emphasize the beauty of mercy and forgiveness.

 

The Divine Mercy Rosary shown above has beads of red and white to symbolize the blood and water flowing from Christ.  The center medal has Saint Faustina on one side and Christ on the reverse.

Catholics are encouraged to say the prayers known as the Chaplet of Divine Mercy at any time of the year.  Divine Mercy is especially remembered, however, on the Sunday following Easter.

To learn more about rosaries, center medals, crosses, and crucifixes, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  This hardcover reference book published by Schiffer Publishing contains over 200 color photographs ranging from the carved boxwood rosary owned by England’s King Henry VIII to rosaries honoring Pope Francis.  The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon, The Catholic Faith Store, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online sellers.

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Rosaries of Easter

14 Apr

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Easter, the greatest feast of the Catholic Church, celebrates Christ’s resurrection from the dead. Rosaries honoring this special day often have centers with symbols of the resurrection or a figure of the risen Christ and beads of pastel colors. Many have additional features on the crucifix in remembrance of the events of Holy Week, the days preceding Easter.

The rosary shown above has a center with the Risen Christ and beads in the colors of Easter.

The lily is the traditional flower of Easter because according to legend, lilies could seen growing in the Garden of Gethsemane after Christ’s suffering on Good Friday. Lilies are reminders of hope and life after trials.

Each bead of the rosary shown below is formed in the shape of a lily.  The center medal shows the Risen Christ.

The rosary shown below has a color picture of the Risen Christ in the center medal.

Easter is a time to celebrate the beauty of the rosary.

To learn more about unique rosaries, crosses, crucifixes, and center medals read The Rosary Collector’s Guide. This hardcover, 152 page reference book, contains 240 color photographs of rosaries and related religious articles. Published by Schiffer Publishing, The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available on Amazon.com, the Catholic Faith Store Online, Barnes and Noble, and other bookstores and religious article stores.

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Going Dancing with the Stars? Take Your Rosary !

1 Apr

 When Olympic gymnast Simone Biles traveled to Los Angeles to compete in Dancing with the Stars  did she bring along her gold medals?  Probably not, but it is highly likely that she brought her rosary.   During her years of competing in national and international events,  the talented gymnast always carried her rosary in her duffel bag.  She told US Weekly, “My mom, Nellie, got me a rosary at church. I don’t use it to pray before a competition. I’ll just pray normally to myself, but I have it there in case.” *

Gold medals are great souvenirs but a rosary is essential.  When you see Simone on the dance floor, know that her rosary is with her.

To learn more about rosaries, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  With over 200 color photographs of rosaries, crosses, crucifixes, and center medals, this 152 page hardcover book published by Schiffer Publishing will answer your questions about the rosary’s history.  From the boxwood rosary owned by England’s King Henry VIII to rosaries honoring Pope Francis, this book will show you unique rosaries throughout history.

The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble.com, the Catholic Faith Store, Rosary Parts, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online sites.

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Reference: Sprunk, Cara. World Champion Gymnast, Olympic Hopeful Simone Biles: What’s In My Bag?

http:/www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-style/news/simone-biles-whats-in-my-bag-w212070?utm_source=email

The Irish Penal Rosary: The Hidden Rosary

17 Mar

penal4  In the early 18th century, laws in Ireland kept  Catholics from practicing their religion openly.   Penal Laws of the day led Catholics to hide religious articles so that they would not be punished.   The Penal Rosary, a one decade rosary that could be hidden in a pocket or up a sleeve, was created for those wanted to pray the rosary secretly.

The Penal Rosary begins with a loop that slips around the thumb.   A capped Pater (Our Father) bead and  ten Ave (Hail Mary) beads  follow.    After the first decade of the rosary is said, the loop is moved to the first finger.  As each decade is completed, the loop is moved to the next finger.  The rosary is complete when five decades have been said.

penal3The Penal Crucifix contains symbols of the passion of Christ.   The jug shown near Christ’s right hand represents the chalice used at the Last Supper.  Instruments near Christ’s left hand symbolize cords used for binding.   The spear shown below  Christ’s right  side  represents the spear used at Calvary.  A ladder to Christ’s left refers to the act of crucifixion.

penal2The reverse of the Penal Crucifix contains additional symbols of the crucifixion.  The V shape in the middle represents three nails used for crucifixion.  The bird and container below it refer to the story that Judas betrayed Christ at the time of the crucifixion.

penal4The Penal Rosary is an appropriate form to use during the month of March.  It helps Catholics reflect upon the Crucifixion of Christ and recalls Irish heritage.

RosaryCollectorsGuideTo learn more about the history of the rosary, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  Published by Schiffer Publishing,  The Rosary Collector’s Guide is a 152 page hardcover reference book with more than 200 color photographs of rosaries, crucifixes, crosses, and center medals.  It helps collectors identify unique religious articles and explains their history.  The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available on Amazon.com, the Catholic Faith Store Online, Catholic Gifts, Barnes and Noble, and other bookstores, religious article stores, and online sellers.

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