Stations of the Cross Chaplet

28 Mar

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Throughout Lent, Christians reflect upon Christ’s journey to Calvary. Worshippers have come to know the 14 Stations of the Cross, the most significant moments that occurred as Christ carried His cross.

During the Crusades (1095-1270), many groups of pilgrims went to the Holy Land to recreate Christ’s walk to Calvary. Later when the Holy Land became the center of conflict, travel there became dangerous and many chose to remain at their home churches for worship. They commemorated Christ’s walk to Calvary by erecting wooden signs and pictures, Stations of the Cross, outside their churches. Walking these stations became a popular devotion throughout Europe in the Middle Ages. The first sets of stations varied in number from five to twenty. Pope Clement XII set the number at fourteen in 1731 and that has remained the standard. Plaques representing the Stations of the Cross can be found inside the perimeter of most Catholic churches.

The Stations of the Cross Chaplet has medals with images representing each station.

The Stations of the Cross Chaplet has medals with images representing each station.

The Stations of the Cross beads shown are known as a chaplet, a term used for any prayer beads that differ from the traditional five decade rosary. The Stations of the Cross Chaplet consists of fourteen groups of three beads each, with medals representing each station. The worshipper begins at the first station by saying the prayer attributed to St. Francis of Assisi, ” We adore thee, O Christ, and praise thee”. Then an Our Father, Hail Mary, and Glory Be, are said on the next three beads. The sequence is repeated at each group of three beads, offering the opportunity to reflect upon each station.

The front of each medal represents one Station of the Cross.

The front of each medal represents one Station of the Cross.

The reverse of each medal says, "WE ADORE THEE O CHRIST, AND  PRAISE THEE".

The reverse of each medal says, “WE ADORE THEE O CHRIST, AND PRAISE THEE”.

The Stations of the Cross Chaplet is used most often during Lent but is appropriate at any time of the year.

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To learn more about unique rosaries, chaplets, crosses, crucifixes, and center medals, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide, a 152 page hardcover reference book with over 240 color photographs published by Schiffer Books. The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available on Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, the Catholic Faith Store, Schiffer Publishing, and other book stores, online sellers, and religious article stores.

Please send questions and comments to rosarycollector@aol.com

Hoffner Rosary Book PhotoGloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner, authors of The Rosary Collector’s Guide, are often able to bring their extensive rosary collection to show to church groups, school groups, and community organizations.   To arrange a presentation, contact them at rosarycollector@aol.com

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One Response to “Stations of the Cross Chaplet”

  1. Giovanna Lottes March 28, 2015 at 10:23 PM #

    Oh how I hated the stations of the cross!

    See you tomorrow.

    Rosary Collector wrote: > a:hover { color: red; } a { text-decoration: none; color: #0088cc; } a.primaryactionlink:link, a.primaryactionlink:visited { background-color: #2585B2; color: #fff; } a.primaryactionlink:hover, a.primaryactionlink:active { background-color: #11729E !important; color: #fff !important; } /* @media only screen and (max-device-width: 480px) { .post { min-width: 700px !important; } } */ WordPress.com rosarycollector posted: ” Throughout Lent, Christians reflect upon Christ’s journey to Calvary. Worshippers have come to know the 14 Stations of the Cross, the most significant moments that occurred as Christ carried His cross. During the Crusades (1095-1270), many groups o”

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