The Pieta Rosary with Budded Crucifix

24 Aug

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Artists throughout the world have created statues, paintings, and tapestries that show various aspects of the life of Mary, the Mother of God. One of the most honored works of art is known as the Pieta, sculpted by 24 year old Michelangelo in 1499.
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The word Pieta means compassion or pity. The statue shows Mary holding the body of her son, Jesus, after he had been taken down from the cross.

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Cardinal Jean de Bilheres de Lagraulas asked Michelangelo to create the statue. At the time, the Cardinal represented the King of France at the Papal Court. The statue was completed in one year and placed in the Basilica of St. Peter for all to admire.

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In 1962, Cardinal Spellman of New York asked Pope John XXIII to send the Pieta to New York for exhibit in the World’s Fair. The Pope agreed and the 68 inch high, 6,600 pound statue made the trip from Rome to New York by ship.

Upon arrival in the United States, the Pieta was placed in the Vatican Pavilion on the grounds of the New York World’s Fair. In addition to the Pieta, the Vatican Pavilion contained a statue of the Good Shepherd as well as other religious art.

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Our Little Messenger, a weekly newsletter distributed to children attending Catholic schools in the United States, alerted students to the exhibit of religious art at the World’s Fair. The September 20, 1963, third grade edition shown above describes the Vatican Pavilion.

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The Pieta was exhibited at the New York World’s Fair from 1964-1965. Visitors purchased souvenir statues and rosaries with images of the Pieta.

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The photo above shows a plastic souvenir statue and the cardboard box in which it was packaged.

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Rosaries honoring the Pieta were made with pearl beads.
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The center medal of the Pieta rosary shows the famous sculpture.
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The reverse of the center medal says simply, “The Pieta Rosary”.

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The Pieta rosary has a budded crucifix with mother of pearl inlay. This type of crucifix is called a budded crucifix because its corners resemble flower buds. Some have called it the Trinity Crucifix with the thought that the three parts of every bud represent the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. It has a third title, the Apostle’s Crucifix, because each of the four sections has three buds, a total of twelve, one for each apostle.

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Pieta Rosaries with pearl beads were made from 1964-1965 as souvenirs of the New York World’s Fair.

http://www.amazon.com/Rosary-Collectors-Guide-Gloria-Hoffner/dp/0764345354

To learn more about unique rosaries, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner. This 152 page hardcover book has 240 color photographs of rosaries, crucifixes, crosses, and center medals. It helps antique dealers, collectors, and historians identify unique religious articles.
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Helen Hoffner and Gloria Brady Hoffner, authors of The Rosary Collector’s Guide, are often able to bring their collection to show to church groups, school groups, and community organizations. To arrange a presentation or to ask a question about a rosary, contact them at rosarycollector@aol.com
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One Response to “The Pieta Rosary with Budded Crucifix”

  1. Giovanna Lottes August 24, 2014 at 3:23 PM #

    Beautiful

    Rosary Collector wrote: > a:hover { color: red; } a { text-decoration: none; color: #0088cc; } a.primaryactionlink:link, a.primaryactionlink:visited { background-color: #2585B2; color: #fff; } a.primaryactionlink:hover, a.primaryactionlink:active { background-color: #11729E !important; color: #fff !important; } /* @media only screen and (max-device-width: 480px) { .post { min-width: 700px !important; } } */ WordPress.com rosarycollector posted: ” Artists throughout the world have created statues, paintings, and tapestries that show various aspects of the life of Mary, the Mother of God. One of the most honored works of art is known as the Pieta, sculpted by 24 year old Michelangelo in 1499. “

    Like

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