Sister Faustina, John Paul II, and the Divine Mercy Rosary

27 Apr
Sister Maria Faustina Kowalska (1905-1938) was a member of the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy.

Sister Maria Faustina Kowalska (1905-1938) was a member of the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy.

On Sunday, April 27,2014, the Catholic Church honored two special events. Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII were raised to sainthood. April 27  also marked Divine Mercy Sunday. It was fitting that these two events were celebrated on the same day because it was Pope John Paul II who declared that Divine Mercy Sunday should be commemorated every year on the first Sunday after Easter. Divine Mercy Sunday was born of the vision of Helena Kowalska, later known as Sister Maria Faustina Kowalska.

Sister Maria Faustina Kowalska of Poland is credited with spreading the word of Christ’s divine mercy. On February 22, 1931, Sister Faustina wrote in her diary that she saw a vision of Christ standing with one hand outstretched in blessing and the other hand clutching His side, wounded by a spear at the time of His crucifixion. She said that Jesus encouraged her to remind the world of His mercy and forgiveness. He told her to have a painting made to commemorate this vision and to include the words, “Jesus, I trust in you”.

Sister Faustina is shown with a painting recreating the vision of Christ.

Sister Faustina is shown with a painting recreating the vision of Christ.

 

This rosary has a Divine Mercy center medal.

This rosary has a Divine Mercy center medal.

Rosaries have been made to honor Sister Faustina for the efforts she made to spread the word of Christ’s Divine Mercy.
Faustina7

Faustina8

The rosary shown below has red beads to represent Christ’s blood and clear beads to symbolize water, the sign of new life.

Sister Faustina is shown on the center medal of this rosary.

Sister Faustina is shown on the center medal of this rosary.

The reverse of the Sister Faustina medal shows the Divine Mercy vision and says, "Jesus I Trust In You".

The reverse of the Sister Faustina medal shows the Divine Mercy vision and says, “Jesus I Trust In You”.

Although Sister Faustina saw the vision in 1931, the Divine Mercy Rosary was not widely used until later in the 20th century. Sister Faustina was canonized on April 30, 2000.

Sister Faustina reported that as she prayed for her native Poland, she heard these words, “I bear a special love for Poland, and if she will be obedient to My will, I will exalt her in might and holiness. From her will come forth the spark that will prepare the world for My final coming”. ( Notebook VI 1732). Pope John Paul II encouraged the devotional of The Divine Mercy. It is appropriate that Divine Mercy Sunday and the canonization of John Paul II be linked as a tribute to Poland and encouragement of continued devotion.

To learn more about antique and unusual rosaries and related religious articles, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide, a 152 page hardback reference book with 240 color photographs. The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available on Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, the Catholic Faith Store Online, and other book stores and religious article stores. The Rosary Collector’s Guide is published by  Schiffer Publishing.

http://www.amazon.com/Rosary-Collectors-Guide-Gloria-Hoffner/dp/0764345354

Contact the authors of The Rosary Collector’s Guide at rosarycollector@aol.com
The authors are available to answer your questions about rosaries. They are also often able to give presentations for church groups, school groups, and community organizations.

http://www.catholicfaithstore.com/Store/…/The-Rosary-Collectors-Guide.html

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3 Responses to “Sister Faustina, John Paul II, and the Divine Mercy Rosary”

  1. Johanna Rebarchak April 27, 2014 at 8:27 PM #

    I so much appreciate these photos of unusual rosaries. I have had a devotion to Mary for the whole of my life. Johanna

    Like

    • rosarycollector April 27, 2014 at 9:35 PM #

      Thank you, Johanna. My mother and I have been collecting rosaries and researching their history for over 30 years. We enjoy sharing our collection with others.

      Like

  2. rosarycollector April 2, 2016 at 11:40 PM #

    Reblogged this on Rosary Collector.

    Like

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