The Kitchen Madonna

22 Apr

 

When we think of the Holy Family, we remember Mary’s ability to create a nurturing environment for Baby Jesus.  Religious articles which depict Mary’s role as a homemaker are known as Kitchen Madonnas.

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The Kitchen Madonna above was made in the 1950s.  The fireplace symbolizes the warmth of the home.  Mary holds a loaf of bread to show her willingness to provide for her family.

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The plaque above recreates the same scene but this item was made in the 2000s.

As we complete our daily tasks, Kitchen Madonnas remind us of the spirit of the Holy Family.

 

IMG_3051  To learn more about religious articles, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  Published by Schiffer Publishing, The Rosary Collector’s Guide contains over 200 color photographs of rosaries, crosses, and center medals.  The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon, and other book stores and religious article stores.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Chaplet of Divine Mercy

8 Apr

Divine Mercy Sunday will be celebrated in the United States on April 8, 2018.

 

Sister Faustina is shown with a painting recreating the vision of Christ.

On April 30, 2000, Pope John Paul II declared, “Throughout the world the Second Sunday of Easter will receive the name Divine Mercy Sunday, a perennial invitation to the Christian world to face, with confidence in divine benevolence, the difficulties and trials that mankind will experience in the years to come.”   The pope made that proclamation during the mass in which he canonized Saint Faustina. ( The Feast of Mercy, EWTN, http://www.ewtn.com).

Saint Faustina was given the name Helen Kowalska at birth and took the name Sister Maria Faustina when she entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy.  It is said that Christ came to her and asked her to spread word of his mercy.  This Polish nun was instructed to have a painting made showing Christ with blood and water flowing from His sides and the words, “Jesus, I trust in you.

Sister Maria Faustina Kowalska (1905-1938) was a member of the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy.  Many rosaries have been created as remembrances of Divine Mercy.  The rosary shown above has a center medal showing Christ and it comes in a box that honors Saint Faustina.

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Pope Francis declared a Jubilee Year of Mercy that stretched from 2015 to 2016.  The Ghirelli Company created a rosary to honor that special time.  The Ghirelli Year of Mercy Rosary has a cross that shows both Christ and Pope Francis.

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The center medal of the Ghirelli Year of Mercy Rosary shows the Prodigal Son to emphasize the beauty of mercy and forgiveness.

 

The Divine Mercy Rosary shown above has beads of red and white to symbolize the blood and water flowing from Christ.  The center medal has Saint Faustina on one side and Christ on the reverse.

Catholics are encouraged to say the prayers known as the Chaplet of Divine Mercy at any time of the year.  Divine Mercy is especially remembered, however, on the Sunday following Easter.

To learn more about rosaries, center medals, crosses, and crucifixes, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  This hardcover reference book published by Schiffer Publishing contains over 200 color photographs ranging from the carved boxwood rosary owned by England’s King Henry VIII to rosaries honoring Pope Francis.  The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon, The Catholic Faith Store, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online sellers.

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Rosaries in the Easter Season

30 Mar

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Easter, the greatest feast of the Catholic Church, celebrates Christ’s resurrection from the dead. Rosaries honoring this special day often have centers with symbols of the resurrection or a figure of the risen Christ and beads of pastel colors. Many have additional features on the crucifix in remembrance of the events of Holy Week, the days preceding Easter.

The rosary shown above has a center with the Risen Christ and beads in the colors of Easter.

The lily is the traditional flower of Easter because according to legend, lilies could seen growing in the Garden of Gethsemane after Christ’s suffering on Good Friday. Lilies are reminders of hope and life after trials.

Each bead of the rosary shown below is formed in the shape of a lily.  The center medal shows the Risen Christ.

The rosary shown below has a color picture of the Risen Christ in the center medal.

Easter is a time to celebrate the beauty of the rosary.

To learn more about unique rosaries, crosses, crucifixes, and center medals read The Rosary Collector’s Guide. This hardcover, 152 page reference book, contains 240 color photographs of rosaries and related religious articles. Published by Schiffer Publishing, The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available on Amazon.com, the Catholic Faith Store Online, Barnes and Noble, and other bookstores and religious article stores.

booksigningmomhelen

Stations of the Cross Chaplet

28 Mar

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Throughout Lent, Christians reflect upon Christ’s journey to Calvary. Worshippers have come to know the 14 Stations of the Cross, the most significant moments that occurred as Christ carried His cross.

During the Crusades (1095-1270), many groups of pilgrims went to the Holy Land to recreate Christ’s walk to Calvary. Later when the Holy Land became the center of conflict, travel there became dangerous and many chose to remain at their home churches for worship. They commemorated Christ’s walk to Calvary by erecting wooden signs and pictures, Stations of the Cross, outside their churches. Walking these stations became a popular devotion throughout Europe in the Middle Ages. The first sets of stations varied in number from five to twenty. Pope Clement XII set the number at fourteen in 1731 and that has remained the standard. Plaques representing the Stations of the Cross can be found inside the perimeter of most Catholic churches.

The Stations of the Cross Chaplet has medals with images representing each station.

The Stations of the Cross beads shown are known as a chaplet, a term used for any prayer beads that differ from the traditional five decade rosary. The Stations of the Cross Chaplet consists of fourteen groups of three beads each, with medals representing each station. The worshipper begins at the first station by saying the prayer attributed to St. Francis of Assisi, ” We adore thee, O Christ, and praise thee”. Then an Our Father, Hail Mary, and Glory Be, are said on the next three beads. The sequence is repeated at each group of three beads, offering the opportunity to reflect upon each station.

The front of each medal represents one Station of the Cross.

The reverse of each medal says, "WE ADORE THEE O CHRIST, AND  PRAISE THEE".

The Stations of the Cross Chaplet is used most often during Lent but is appropriate at any time of the year.

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To learn more about unique rosaries, chaplets, crosses, crucifixes, and center medals, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide, a 152 page hardcover reference book with over 240 color photographs published by Schiffer Books. The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available on Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, the Catholic Faith Store, Schiffer Publishing, and other book stores, online sellers, and religious article stores.

Please send questions and comments to rosarycollector@aol.com

Irish Horn Rosaries

17 Mar

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When we think of Irish rosaries, our thoughts often turn to those made of Connemara marble or those with Celtic crucifixes. The Irish Horn Rosary, however, is perhaps the most symbolic of Ireland because it represents the hard work of the people of Dublin.

In 1927, the Mitchell Rosary Factory opened in Dublin and began production of rosaries made of horn, a material derived from naturally shed antlers of deer and goats. While many celebrated the creation of new jobs, there was also a cost to the city. The horn was boiled in large vats to soften it for bead making. The smell of boiling horn was extremely strong and annoyed many residents. Young girls working in the factory covered their hair with nets in the hopes of keeping the smell from clinging. There were many objections to the smell and the Mitchell Rosary Factory stopped making horn rosaries circa 1960.

In his memoir, It’s a Long Way from Penny Apples, Bill Cullen discussed his family’s work with the Mitchell Rosary Factory. In addition to the many full-time factory workers, others who lived in Dublin picked up supplies and then strung beads at home. They were paid by the decade.

Irish horn rosaries usually have a heart-shaped center and a horn crucifix with a white corpus.

To learn more about antique and unusual rosaries, read our new book, The Rosary Collector’s Guide, available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon.com, the Catholic Faith Store, and other booksellers.

41rUas4idPL__SY346_

Stations of the Cross Chaplet

8 Mar

stations1

Throughout Lent, Christians reflect upon Christ’s journey to Calvary. Worshippers have come to know the 14 Stations of the Cross, the most significant moments that occurred as Christ carried His cross.

During the Crusades (1095-1270), many groups of pilgrims went to the Holy Land to recreate Christ’s walk to Calvary. Later when the Holy Land became the center of conflict, travel there became dangerous and many chose to remain at their home churches for worship. They commemorated Christ’s walk to Calvary by erecting wooden signs and pictures, Stations of the Cross, outside their churches. Walking these stations became a popular devotion throughout Europe in the Middle Ages. The first sets of stations varied in number from five to twenty. Pope Clement XII set the number at fourteen in 1731 and that has remained the standard. Plaques representing the Stations of the Cross can be found inside the perimeter of most Catholic churches.

The Stations of the Cross Chaplet has medals with images representing each station.

The Stations of the Cross beads shown are known as a chaplet, a term used for any prayer beads that differ from the traditional five decade rosary. The Stations of the Cross Chaplet consists of fourteen groups of three beads each, with medals representing each station. The worshipper begins at the first station by saying the prayer attributed to St. Francis of Assisi, ” We adore thee, O Christ, and praise thee”. Then an Our Father, Hail Mary, and Glory Be, are said on the next three beads. The sequence is repeated at each group of three beads, offering the opportunity to reflect upon each station.

The front of each medal represents one Station of the Cross.

The reverse of each medal says, "WE ADORE THEE O CHRIST, AND  PRAISE THEE".

The Stations of the Cross Chaplet is used most often during Lent but is appropriate at any time of the year.

41rUas4idPL__SY346_

To learn more about unique rosaries, chaplets, crosses, crucifixes, and center medals, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide, a 152 page hardcover reference book with over 240 color photographs published by Schiffer Books. The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available on Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, the Catholic Faith Store, Schiffer Publishing, and other book stores, online sellers, and religious article stores.

Please send questions and comments to rosarycollector@aol.com

Seven Sorrows of Mary

2 Mar

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To learn more about unique rosaries, read The Rosary Collector’s Guide by Gloria Brady Hoffner and Helen Hoffner.  Published by Schiffer Publishing, The Rosary Collector’s Guide contains over 200 color photographs of rosaries, crosses, crucifixes, and center medals ranging from those owned by England’s King Henry VIII to those honoring Pope Francis.  The Rosary Collector’s Guide is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon.com, the Catholic Faith Store, and other book stores, religious article stores, and online sites.

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